Category Archives: Nonprofit Organizations

Audit Requirements for Nonprofits

What do we mean when we talk about an audit?  There are several kinds of audit, each for a different purpose, but the one most likely to be needed by a charity or nonprofit is an independent financial audit.  It is an examination of an organization’s records to determine the accuracy of its financial statements covering a specific time period, and it is conducted by a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) at the organization’s expense.  The IRS does not require this type of audit, but an independent audit may be required by large donors, by state agencies, by lenders, or by the organization’s own Board of Directors—in other words, anyone who has a need to determine the organization’s financial health.

Many states where a charity must register to solicit donations require an independent audit to be performed each year that the organization’s revenue or contributions reach a certain level.  State audit requirements vary, from Pennsylvania’s threshold of $300,000 in revenue to California’s threshold of $2 million.  Organizations with less annual revenue may be required to have an independent review of their financial statements, conducted by a CPA.  A review is similar to an audit but requires less work by the auditor and is less expensive for the organization.

An independent audit must comply with what are known as Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), but there can be additional requirements.  For example, an organization which receives federal funds and expends $750,000 or more of those funds in one year must comply with the Single Audit Act of 1984.   Guidelines for this type of audit are issued by the federal Office of Management and Budget.  This requirement applies whether the organization receives the funds from one or from multiple sources, including government contracts, grants, loans, subsidies, and donated property.  Also, federal funding does not only mean the funding that comes directly from the federal government; instead, money that reaches an organization by a pass-through entity, such as a state government or local agency, is also included in this definition.

A ‘Single Audit’ as defined in the law is very similar to an independent audit, but its scope is usually widened to all financial activities and operations of the organization.   It also includes more detailed and in-depth testing of expenses, in order to ensure that all financial data is presented fairly and accurately and that adequate internal controls and checks are in place.  At the same time, this audit also reviews compliance with any federal or state regulations related to the specific program or funding source.   The report of the Single Audit must be made available to the public.

The auditor performing the Single Audit must have a higher level of certification and the increased testing means an increased cost to the organization.  However, the cost is an allowable indirect cost of administering the federal funds.

Starting Your Nonprofit

You’ve decided to start a nonprofit!  You see a need in your community, and you plan to do something about it.  So, where do you start?

  • First, do some brainstorming:
  • What do you hope to achieve, and how do you plan to go about it?
  • What will your organization do that existing organizations aren’t doing?
  • Where will the money come from?
  • What other resources will you need?
  • Will you be able to recruit volunteers?
  • Will you have paid employees?
  • Are there existing groups that you can partner with?

Write out a plan and a budget.   Identify your goals, your own skills and resources, and potential sources of assistance.

Next, decide on a legal structure.  Many nonprofits exist as unincorporated associations, but there may be advantages to creating a nonprofit corporation.  You might want to consult an attorney to discuss the pros and cons.  If you decide to incorporate, you will need to recruit a Board of Directors to manage the organization, register your Articles of Incorporation with your state government (in most states, this registration is done through the Secretary of State’s office), and meet any other state requirements.   Whether or not you incorporate the organization, you will need written documents to outline how your organization will operate.

The next step is to obtain a Federal Tax Identification Number, also known as an Employer ID number (EIN), from the IRS.  Even if the organization will have no paid employees, this will be needed to establish a bank account and to file reports with the IRS.   The IRS has streamlined this procedure, and it can be completed on their website at https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/how-to-apply-for-an-ein.

Once your organization has obtained an EIN, it needs to apply to the IRS to recognize its tax-exempt status.  Nonprofits are exempt from income tax because they have no owners or shareholders; the money they receive is used to carry out the organization’s purposes, and any money left over is kept for future use or donated to other nonprofits.  However, most nonprofits are still required to file annual reports with the IRS.  If your organization wants to be recognized as a charity (its purpose must be charitable, religious, educational, scientific, literary, testing for public safety, fostering national or international amateur sports competition, or preventing cruelty to children or animals), you should apply to the IRS using Form 1023, Application for Recognition of Exemption from Income Tax Under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.  If your nonprofit falls into a different category (for example, a social club or a political organization), you would use IRS Form 1024.  More information is available on the IRS website and in IRS Publication 557.

Once the IRS has approved your application, they will issue a Letter of Determination that specifies your Federal tax-exempt status and whether contributions to your organization are tax-deductible.  But depending on the state where you are located, you may have to apply for exemption from state taxes too.  For example, California and Texas are two of the states that require a separate application to be exempt from state franchise tax.  State laws also vary as to whether a nonprofit organization is exempt from other state taxes such as sales tax.

Your Letter of Determination will also specify whether you must file an IRS Form 990, Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax, each year.  That form is generally due four months and 15 days after the close of your organization’s fiscal year.

Nonprofit organizations are required to disclose information on their finances to the public.  Your Form 990 is considered public information and you must provide copies upon request.  You may also be required to include information telling how to request those copies on your website and in any solicitation literature.

And will your organization be soliciting donations from the public?  If so, most states will require you to register to solicit donations in their state.  We won’t go into the details here, because registration requirements and fees are different for each state.  If you hire a professional fundraiser or fundraising consultant, they may also be required to register.   Then most charitable solicitation registrations must be renewed each year, and you may be required to obtain an independent audit of the organization’s financial statements.  It can get complicated, but that’s why we’re here–to make the process easier.

How to File the Form 990 Extension – Form 8868

May 15th is fast upon us and with that we get a lot of calls asking us how to file an extension for the 990 series of informational returns from our website. Unfortunately we do not offer that service at this time but here is some information that will hopefully get your organization through the process.

File by Mail

Download and fill in the Form 8868: Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File an Exempt Organization Return from the IRS website and mail it to:

Department of the Treasury
Internal Revenue Service Center
Ogden, UT 84201-0045

File Electronically (Preferred)

You can have your accountant file the form for your organization electronically through their software package.

Or

You can choose one of the IRS Exempt Organizations Modernized e-File Providers

Typically the e-File websites are quite straight forward and only ask you a few questions about your organization and contact information.  Also, most are free or at a low cost to your organization depending on your revenue.

Once you have secured your organizations extension approval for the Form 990 then you can come back to our website and preview the state specific instructions for the charity registration renewal or annual update forms.   Most states do require you to individually file an extension of time request with their state charity office if your organization will also require more time to file your renewals/updates with them.

Here is a link to our previous blog: State Charity Renewal Due Dates

Please contact us with any comments, questions or concerns at (800) 780-6027 or support@SimpleCharityRegstration.com.

 

 

Charity Resources – Who Should I Call? FAQ’s?

Looking for some help with your nonprofit? Almost all states have an association devoted to nonprofit assistance no matter where your organization is in its lifecycle. Whether you just need a form or something more complex they will most likely have the answer. Most state associations offer online training, research and local events that you can attend to get more familiar with your fellow non-profiteer!

State Association Link
Alabama Alabama Association of Nonprofits http://www.alabamanonprofits.org/
Alaska The Foraker Group http://www.forakergroup.org/
Arizona * Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits http://arizonanonprofits.org/?
Arkansas Arkansas Nonprofit Alliance https://www.arkansasnonprofits.org/
California California Association of Nonprofits http://www.calnonprofits.org/
Colorado Colorado Association of Nonprofits https://www.coloradononprofits.org/
Connecticut CT Community Nonprofit Alliance http://ctnonprofitalliance.org/
Delaware * Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement http://www.delawarenonprofit.org/
District of Columbia Center for Nonprofit Advancement https://www.nonprofitadvancement.org/
Florida Florida Nonprofit Alliance http://www.flnonprofits.org/
Georgia
Hawaii Hawaii Alliance of Nonprofit Organizations http://hano-hawaii.org/newhano/
Idaho * Idaho Nonprofit Center https://www.idahononprofits.org/
Illinois Forefront https://myforefront.org/
Indiana * Indiana Nonprofit Resource Network http://www.inrn.org/
Iowa* Iowa Nonprofit Resource Center https://inrc.law.uiowa.edu/
Kansas
Kentucky Kentucky Nonprofit Network https://www.kynonprofits.org/
Louisiana Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Organizations http://www.lano.org/
Maine Maine Association of Nonprofit https://www.nonprofitmaine.org/
Maryland Maryland Nonprofits https://marylandnonprofits.org/Default.aspx
Massachusetts Massachusetts Nonprofit Network http://massnonprofitnet.org/
Providers’ Council http://www.providers.org/
Michigan Michigan Nonprofit Association https://www.mnaonline.org/
Minnesota Minnesota Council of Nonprofits http://www.minnesotanonprofits.org/
Mississippi Mississippi Center for Nonprofits http://msnonprofits.org/
Missouri Nonprofit Connect https://www.npconnect.org/
Nonprofit Missouri https://www.nonprofitmissouri.org/
Montana  * Montana Nonprofit Association http://www.mtnonprofit.org/
Nebraska  * Nonprofit Association of the Midlands http://www.nonprofitam.org/
Nevada Alliance for Nevada Nonprofits http://alliancefornevadanonprofits.com/
New Hampshire NH Center for Nonprofits http://www.nhnonprofits.org/
New Jersey Center for Nonprofits http://www.njnonprofits.org/
New Mexico
New York New York Council of Nonprofits http://www.nycon.org/
Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York https://www.npccny.org/
North Carolina North Carolina Center for Nonprofits http://www.ncnonprofits.org/
North Dakota North Dakota Association of Nonprofit Organizations http://www.ndano.org/
Ohio Ohio Association of Child Caring Agencies http://www.oacca.org/
Oklahoma Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits https://www.oklahomacenterfornonprofits.org/
Oregon The Nonprofit Association of Oregon http://nonprofitoregon.org/
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Association of Nonprofit Organizations http://pano.org/
Rhode Island
South Carolina Together SC http://www.togethersc.org/
South Dakota *
Tennessee
Texas * Texas Association of Nonprofit Organizations https://tano.org/
Utah Utah Nonprofit Association https://utahnonprofits.org/
Vermont  * Common Good Vermont http://commongoodvt.org/
Virginia
Washington Washington Nonprofits https://washingtonnonprofits.org/
West Virginia West Virginia Nonprofit Association https://wvnpa.org/
Wisconsin Wisconsin Nonprofits https://www.wisconsinnonprofits.org/
Wyoming * Wyoming Nonprofit Network http://www.wynonprofit.org/
* States that do not have charitable registration requirements as of 9/1/2016.

Most states encourage out of state nonprofits to join their membership or offer free resources so if your state nonprofit association can not answer your question another may have whole libraries full of information for you!!

If you have a great resource and want to share it with us or other nonprofits please send us the information or link and we will post it in a future blog.

Please contact us with any comments, questions or concerns at (800) 780-6027 or support@SimpleCharityRegstration.com.

State Charity Registration – Which Fiscal Year Should We File?

One of the most common questions we hear from new state charity registration filers is in which fiscal year they should file. This is not a problem for renewals, because it is clear they are reporting on the previous year. But, should an organization that has never filed in a state use the current fiscal year or the previous one?

Unlike many other questions involving state charitable solicitation registration, this one is more or less straightforward. You should file using the year of your most recently filed tax form, remembering that the states are expecting organizations to register prior to solicitation.

Let’s go through some scenarios to see what this means.

  1. A new charity that has not yet completed a fiscal year or filed an IRS 990, 990-PF, or 990-EZ would file projected information for the current fiscal year and then send the filed form to the states once it’s ready.
  2. An existing charity that has not solicited in a state in the past but anticipates doing so will register based on their most recently completed fiscal year.
  3. An existing charity that has already solicited in a state but is only recently aware of the state’s charitable solicitation requirement would file based on their most recently filed IRS 990, 990-PF, or 990-EZ. Note that some states may require you to back-file a few years. (See our blog on noncompliance).
    1. In this scenario, because the states require registration prior to solicitation, if you are near the end of your fiscal year, you would use your prior year form and then renew in a few months when your renewals are due.

Thankfully, with Simple Charity Registration you can register more easily and copy your data from one year to the next. Straightforward and Simple!

 

Fundraising Registration Penalties for Non-compliance

Non-compliance has been all over the news lately from the Donald Trump Foundation not being registered to solicit contributions to 7 West Virginia residents operating a fraudulent charity that netted them millions of dollars by using state-issued gaming licenses of two nonprofit organizations to divert money into corporate accounts.

If you’re looking to avoid the paperwork and not register your charity on the hope that your organization does not need to because you are exempt, that you do not hold any events outside your home state, or that all our money is used for mostly programs you may want to think again. You can no longer plead ignorance about state registration.  It’s in the nightly news, it’s in your inbox and even talked about in every industry seminar, webinar and podcast.

The Consequences

The civil penalties associated with failure to register typically mean fines for the organization itself. They can often be fairly substantial taking quite a bite out of your group’s yearly revenue. Often, as in the State of Maryland, fines of $5,000 or more can be imposed for every single violation, so each time your group held an event and you weren’t registered, you may be adding to your tally.   If a court determines that your nonprofit failed to register, it can order that it make restitution thus forcing you to return the donations received while in default.

The fines aren’t the only problem with a failure to register. If you knowingly fail to comply with the state’s charitable registration act, you could be facing up to felony charges just for failing to comply. This can extend to anyone on the directorial board who knew registration was required, and could mean extensive personal fines or even jail time for you and your board members. Not to mention the loss of credibility with the public as some states publish a list of offenders, so your organization could end up in the news defending itself against the claims of non-compliance.

The penalties for filing inaccurate IRS forms against your nonprofit can be to $20 per day up to the lesser of $10,000 or 5% of your annual gross receipts, penalties against the individual responding to any informational deficit request from the IRS in time can be up to $10 per day up to a maximum of $5,000, and possible loss of tax exemption.

Some Examples

A sampling of several state websites on the issue of non-compliance found that  South Carolina states in their FAQ’s section, “If a charitable organization solicits contributions without being registered, submits false information to the Secretary of State, is delinquent in a filing or violates any other provision of the “Solicitation of Charitable Funds Act,” the Secretary of State may assess an administrative fine of up to $2,000 for each separate violation. It is extremely important that charitable organizations submit all forms and documents in a timely manner to avoid the assessment of administrative fines.”

Other states like Illinois conclude that your organization has been soliciting in their state the entire time your organization has been in business and will assess late fees for up to three years and require the submission of the missed annual reports to your existing charity.  They will impose a $200 late registration fee and will require the annual filing for those years which they assumed you missed which results in a $100 late fee for each of those three years.  The consequence can be up to $500 in late annual report fees and the late registration fee. 225ILCS 460/2 h.

Minnesota states that failure to comply may be a violation of Minnesota law and as such can result in “civil penalties, attorney’s fees, [and] costs.”  Failure to file annual reports puts an organization in default in Minnesota so that they cannot solicit again until they are up to date on all filings, have paid a $50 fee, and file a new registration.

In New York, there are two overlapping categories of registration — one for soliciting from New York State residents (7-A), and the other for doing business in New York State (EPTL) — that are filed on the same forms. Monetary penalties for failing to register under 7-A are $1000 per violation and up to $100 per day of noncompliance. For EPTL it is up to $10 per day with a $1,000 max. Penalties are combined for those organizations subject to both rules.

Washington State  code 19.09.271-279 penalizes non-filers after five days’ notice by publishing a press release on internet and newspapers of a notice of the charity’s unregistered status. Knowingly giving false information in your filing is punishable as a misdemeanor under RCW Title 9A Chapter 20.

The Good News

We spoke with the charity offices of 11 states that require state registration to find out their approach to noncompliance. All said that they do not generally issue penalties for initial registrations in order to encourage compliance but added that the charity should show good faith and send in the registration form with all attachments as soon as possible. Note, this generosity is reserved for charities that register proactively. A charity that the state discovers is not in compliance is likely to receive penalties.

Once registering, the charity should also make sure that the application package is complete, signed and accurate. In a case where there has been solicitation prior to registration, a couple of the states require filing up to 3-4 years of registration forms and fees to cover the solicitation period.

As you might expect, the states could not absolutely rule out penalties, which would be incurred for extenuating circumstances, such as other compliance issues. Organizations with larger revenues and/or long-term solicitation may receive some more scrutiny, so applications should be triple checked for completion and accuracy.

Let’s Review

As you can tell, there is a difference in what we found on the state websites and in their solicitation regulations and when we spoke with them.  The regulations are in place for the serious of offenders but the states really just would like the nonprofits to comply voluntarily.

Regardless of penalties, you should file where required. Penalties grow steeper for willful violations of the law. Also, when you file, your information must be accurate. The biggest penalties are reserved for those who knowingly file incorrect or incomplete information because accurate information protects states and their residents from fraud. The bottom line is that charities need to know what the state registration requirements are, how they apply to their organization, and how to follow them.

Your Resources

No charity ever feels like they have enough resources but it is not worth the risk of losing your reputation or the possibly of your board being fined over the cost of not registering.  No one wants to go to that meeting.  There are many resources out there that can help you register depending on your budget.

If you get the right person on the phone with the states, they will help you through the process but that is a long and arduous task.  You will need to fill out the application or registration for each state separately and supply each with various attachments. You will also have to look up each state’s requirements one by one as each state requires a little something different.

Hiring a professional to perform the task for you is expensive and you still have to gather all the information and review all the paperwork for each state that you are registering in, so why not save the money.  Ultimately, you are still responsible for those state registrations.

Our Solution

Use our affordable form-fill software that will help you through the process of registration and renewal easily and affordably.  We have the most up to date forms, attachments and instructions available in one place with an added benefit of saving the information from year to year making renewal or expansion easier.  You are able to add additional states as needed if you want to hold an event in a new state or expand your programs somewhere new.

This can be done in a few simple steps:

  1. The compliance wizard will help you determine where you need to register or renew
  2. Answer the basic information and state specific questions
  3. Print the completed forms and attachments, sign and send

Please contact us with any comments, questions or concerns at (800) 780-6027 or support@SimpleCharityRegstration.com.

Non-profit or Tax Exempt??

Welcome to SimpleCharityRegistration.com.

What is the difference between a nonprofit and being tax exempt?

Tax exemption on the federal level is a designation given by the IRS that basically just says that “if you are providing a community service and not paying a profit to yourself or investors, then you shouldn’t have to pay taxes on the money that you have brought in.” Also, “After you provide the proper documentation the IRS will allow your donors the ability to take the monies that they give you as a deduction on their income taxes.” A nonprofit is how you are designating how your business will be structured on the state level which could include any of the following: Unincorporated Association, Nonprofit Corporation, Charitable Trust, or in some cases an LLC.

You may be asking,
“Why do I have to register my nonprofit if I am tax exempt?”

The simple answer is that you are letting the state know that you will be doing business within its boundaries and how you will be conducting that business. Registering your nonprofit with the correct state authorities can be a two step process. The first part is registering with the state that you will be conducting business either as a domestic or foreign entity and how it is structured.

Secondly, you must register with the proper agency where you will be asking their citizens for donations/contributions to fund your organization and what services you will be providing for those funds you will be collecting. These two processes also give the citizens of that state a trusted local authority to confirm if your organization and the money that you are asking them for is being used as you say it will be because the paperwork that you file with the state about your organization as a nonprofit will be available for them to review.

As always please contact us with any comments, questions or concerns at (800)780-6027 or Support@SimpleCharityRegistration.com.

Thanks for watching!

Non-profit Solicitation Registration and Renewal – Penalties

Welcome to SimpleCharityRegitration.com. A common question that our customers ask about state charitable solicitation registration is “What are the penalties for noncompliance?”

States have created charitable solicitation registration in order to provide their residents transparent information about the charities that solicit within their state. They take these rules seriously and expect compliance usually prior to solicitation or within 30 days of the start of solicitation. We picked 4 states for which we could find clear information about penalties to illustrate the types of penalties that exist. Generally, the penalties are steep fines with additional possible consequences for the organization.

Minnesota states that failure to comply may be a violation of Minnesota law and as such can result in “civil penalties, attorney’s fees, [and] costs.” Failure to file annual reports puts an organization in default in Minnesota so that they cannot solicit again until they are up to date on all filings, have paid a $50 fee, and file a new registration.

In New York, there are two overlapping categories of registration — one for soliciting from New York State residents (7-A), and the other for doing business in New York State (EPTL) — that are filed on the same forms. Monetary penalties for failing to register under 7-A are $1000 per violation and up to $100 per day of noncompliance. For EPTL it is up to $10 per day with a $1,000 max. Penalties are combined for those organizations subject to both rules.

Washington State code penalizes non-filers after five days’ notice by publishing a press release on internet and newspapers of a notice of the charity’s unregistered status. Knowingly giving false information in your filing is punishable as a misdemeanor under RCW Title 9A Chapter 20. In Pennsylvania, the registration instructions specify that registration is due within 30 days of the start of solicitation. Late fees are $25 per month or part of month and cannot be waived.

One issue that comes up is whether you are calling attention to your organization if you begin to register when you have not in the past and should have. Bear in mind that these are state regulations and that they carry that weight. Compliance is critical. States want you to comply. Pennsylvania adds in their description of late fees that “organizations electing to voluntarily register are not subject to late fees.” Regardless of penalties, you should file where required.

Penalties grow steeper for willful violations of the law. Also, when you file, your information must be accurate. The biggest penalties are reserved for those who knowingly file incorrect or incomplete information because accurate information protects states and their residents from fraud. The bottom line is that charities need to know what the state registration requirements are, how they apply to their organization, and how to follow them. There are consequences for not doing so.

Please note, this information is not intended as legal advice. We recommend you consult your nonprofit’s legal adviser if you have questions on how fundraising regulations affect your nonprofit.

Please contact us with any comments, questions or concerns on our support line or email us.

Please contact us with any comments, questions or concerns at (800)780-6027 or support@SimpleCharityRegstration.com.

 

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Our Charitable Organization Never Registered ! What Do I Do Now?

Many nonprofits know that registration before you start fundraising activities is a must. Unfortunately, there are some who aren’t familiar with that requirement. As a result, there are groups out there that remain non-compliant with some state requirements for registration. If you’re one of the many that fall under that category, you’re treading in dangerous waters right now. In a world where a simple tweet can be classified as solicitation of funds, failing to register your organization could mean serious penalties.

Can I Just Stay Unregistered?

Even if you’re not sure you’re required to register, doing some research here is a must. Remaining unregistered means risking heavy fines for every single instance where you raised funds but remained unregistered. Those fines can be thousands of dollars each, so if you hold several events throughout the year, it could get very costly to your organization very quickly. Some states even provide criminal penalties for the brass of those groups that fail to register when they know it’s required.

In short, no, staying unregistered is not a good idea.

Register Now

Almost any state will tell you that even if you failed to register before, registering late is far better than never registering. To be clear, you may still face some small fines and penalties, but finding compliance now will mean you’re making a good faith effort to follow the guidelines laid out in each state. We even make that process easier than ever. With a bit of information and a few clicks, we can have your registration paperwork submitted for all applicable states in less time than you ever thought possible, and our free trial will help you find the information you need to determine if and where you need to file. Get started today to prevent problems down the road.

As always please contact us with any comments, questions or concerns at (800)780-6027 or Support@SimpleCharityRegistration.com

More of our tutorials can also be seen on our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/2a1t5YJ 

Do All Charitable Organizations Have to Register?

If you work in the world of nonprofits, you’re probably already familiar with the concept of charity registration. Required for most when seeking new contributions, the statutes governing these vary widely from state to state, and they can encompass almost any kind of fundraising activity; even sending out a flier for a bazaar where you might ask for donations can count. The real question, though, is whether every charity is governed by the same regulations. Since the process can be a bit long and involved, if your charity isn’t required to register, you likely don’t want to have to fight the tide.

The Simple Answer

Unfortunately, the simple answer to this question is a bit more complicated than you may think. No, not every charity is required to register. Some religious organizations are exempt from registration. Some college and universities also fall under exemption rulings. Organizations that only raise a small amount of funds are also exempt. The problem? Even those definitions can vary from state to state. “Religious organizations” may mean different things in Missouri than it does in California. While each state does excuse some nonprofits, that doesn’t universally apply. What’s more, though, is that you have to do your legal research before you ever launch a new campaign or you could be subject to fines and penalties.

You may solicit locally, or only in your state, in which case you may need to register in that state. If you solicit in other states or get grants from out of state foundations, you will have to check the applicable rules. In addition, if you have a “Donate” button on your website that attracts donors from across the US, you will probably need to file in all the states where your donors reside, per an agreement among the states attorneys general called “The Charleston Principles.”

Your Next Step

If you’re a nonprofit, your best bet is to go ahead and register if you’re unsure about your exemption status. Fortunately, we can help. With a streamlined process that makes registration across the United States easier than ever, even before you launch your next campaign, we’ll help to ensure compliance is fulfilled to help you get back to what you do best – raising funds for your cause. Get started the easy way today.

As always please contact us with any comments, questions or concerns at (800)780-6027 or Support@SimpleCharityRegistration.com

More of our tutorials can also be seen on our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/2a1t5YJ