Tag Archives: Religious exemption

What is Religious Exemption?

There is an old joke about an IRS auditor who calls a clergyman to confirm a large donation from a parishioner and asks, “Did Mr. Thompson donate $10,000?” The clergyman thinks a moment and replies with a smile, “He certainly will!”

The interesting thing is that while that donation is tax-deductible for Mr. Thompson, like other nonprofit organizations, the church doesn’t have to pay taxes on it, but unlike other charities, it has even less responsibility for reporting it.

So, what is religious exemption? For charities this is a big question because exemption can mean tax exemption, exemption from financial reporting, and exemption from state charitable solicitation registration in many cases.

Let’s talk about tax exemption and exemption from financial reporting to break it all up. Later we will get into religious exemption from charity registration.

Why is there a special classification for religion?

Churches are protected from government interference by the First Amendment to the Constitution. Therefore, the degree to which an organization is associated with the direct practice of religion determines their level of accountability (reporting) to the IRS and subsequently to the states.

The IRS categorizes religious charities accordingly: churches, their integrated auxiliaries, religious organizations, and other. Each type as defined by the IRS determines what level of reporting they need to do. In general, churches and their integrated auxiliaries (per the IRS) are treated differently from “religious organizations” as follows:

  1. “Church” (used as an overarching term to indicate any similar place of worship, such as a synagogue or mosque) – The IRS gives 14 attributes of a church, primarily among which is being a legally recognized organization and having a congregation and an ordained clergy (see the IRS Tax Guide for Religious Organizations Glossary);
  2. “Integrated auxiliary” is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and public charity that is associated with a church or denomination and is internally funded, though missionary groups and youth groups do not usually need to meet this last criteria. Churches and Integrated Auxiliaries (including the definition of a missionary group) are further defined in the Code of Federal Regulations, 26 CFR Section 1.6033-2(g) & 2(h);
  3. “Religious organizations” — according to the IRS, these can include nondenominational ministries, interdenominational and ecumenical (encompassing multiple Christian faiths) organizations, and groups whose purpose is for the study or advancement of religion; and
  4. Other — If the activity of the organization is primarily secular in function when performed by other groups, the charity may not fit in the religious exemption. 7.26.2.2.1 (03-30-1999)

The biggest difference is that because of the need for the separation between church and state, churches and their integrated auxiliaries don’t have to file a Form 990, while religious organizations do. The other end of that separation is that religious organizations can do some, not substantial, issue based lobbying while churches cannot. Page 10 of the IRS Webinar on Churches and Religious Organizations: Do’s and Don’ts has a chart to help you see where you might fit by what is required of you.

It is important to know where your organization falls on this spectrum to know what is required of you at the federal level. Next, we will delve into how it affects state compliance.

This information is not intended as legal advice or instruction.